All posts tagged HR elements

timayerThis month we’re highlighting our Employee Benefits Advisor and Investment Advisor Representative, Tim Ayer! We’ve asked him a few fun questions to get to know him a little bit better!

What is your favorite aspect of your job?  The satisfaction created by helping people understand and navigate very complicated insurance and financial issues.

Do you have a favorite sports team?  Yes, I am a 40 year die-hard Cincinnati Bengals fan.  I guess that makes me somewhat of a glutton for punishment.

Do you have any collections or hobbies?  I love to fish and hunt when I get the chance.

Before working at Kaminsky & Associates what was the most unusual or interesting job you’ve ever had?  I worked as the VP General Manager of a concrete garden art company, which gave me the opportunity to travel to many parts of the United States that I otherwise wouldn’t have experienced.

What is an ability you wish you had?  Playing guitar.  I messed around with it for about a year but gave it up.

Did you know studies convey that 20% of the population, or 1 in every 5 adults suffer from some sort of mental health condition? Mental health has become a substantially concerning issue in America’s workplace, and therefore a top priority in employee wellness. Mental health conditions such as depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorder cause workers to perform less efficiently on a daily basis, which in turn creates negative effects on both the employees and employers.

Unaddressed mental health problems can leave employees unhappy and less efficient at work, as well as having financial consequences for employers. Studies conducted show that mental health conditions left without treatment cost employers nationwide a total of $80- $100 billion per year. In addition, employers have a duty to ensure physical and mental safety for their workers. In the past, companies have typically encouraged employees to see therapists and potentially receive medication. These treatments can be very effective. According to a recent study by the Partnership for Workplace Mental Health, 86% of those employees that were treated saw improvements in their daily work.

However, these therapy and medication can also be very time consuming and costly. In order to achieve a more efficient and cost effective solution, companies have found creative outlets to provide daily treatment. Enter the mental health app. Human Resources in general is becoming a more app-friendly department. The IAB-commissioned Harris Poll shows mobile phone users spend 88% of their time in applications and appreciate having apps that streamline services on their phones. There are countless apps for companies to choose from, but Mobylize and MoodNotes are two of the most innovative options.

Mobylize

Mobilyze is an employee-focused mobile application that tracks location, movement, sleeping patterns, and phone calls. It then compiles the data to analyze the user’s different moods and sends them messages as well as giving feedback on their responses to try and improve their symptoms. The app is user-specific which helps generate results faster and more accurately, and offers a more convenient and cost-effective option for companies trying to improve their employees’ well-being.

MoodNotes

Other apps, like MoodNotes, provide a more interactive user experience. Like Mobilyze, the app tracks different patterns that may be associated with mental health problems, but also focuses on creating a personal relationship with the user. MoodNotes encourages the user to answer more challenging questions about how they feel and why they may be feeling that way. As a result, the user is forced to think about possible suppressed problems and the reasons behind them. The app’s goal is to act like a mental health coach or friend, and strives to get users back to their healthy, happy selves.

These are only two examples of popular mental health apps that companies are starting to use. The companies that choose to implement these types of apps are continuing to see positive results. The market for mental health apps is growing, providing employees with many options to address specific issues and allowing room to find the best fit. As businesses focus on more ways to implement technology, mobile apps may be a solution to lowering the costs of mental health care, as well as looking out for the well-being of employees and fostering a well-functioning, healthy business environment.

 

By Nicole Federico

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) Office for Civil Rights (OCR) began a pilot program in 2012 to assess the procedures implemented by covered entities to ensure compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). OCR evaluated the effectiveness of the pilot program and then announced Phase 2 of the program on March 21, 2016. Phase 2 Audits focus on the policies and procedures adopted by both covered entities and business associates to ensure they meet selected standards and implementation specifications of the Privacy, Security, and Breach Notification Rules. Covered entities include health plans, health care clearinghouses, and health care providers; whereas, business associates include anyone handling health information on behalf of a covered entity.

Phase 2 Audits of business associates focus on risk analysis, risk management, and reporting of HIPAA breaches to covered entities. OCR emphasizes the importance of audits as a compliance improvement activity in order to identify best practices and proactively uncover and address risks and vulnerabilities to protect health information (PHI).

OCR chose entities to audit through random sampling of the audit pool. Communications from OCR were sent via email, so it is important to check spam filters and junk emails for communications from OSOCRAudit@hhs.gov. OCR emailed a notice to verify contact information. Once the contact information was verified, OCR emailed a pre-audit questionnaire to gather data about size, type, and operations of the entity. This data was used with other information to develop pools of potential covered entities for making audit selections.

Phase 2 Audits consist of three sets of audits. The first set of audits will be desk audits of covered entities and the second set of audits will be desk audits of business associates. These audits will examine compliance with specific requirements of the Privacy, Security, or Breach Notification Rules and covered entities will be notified of their audit in a document request letter. All desk audits in this phase will be completed by the end of December 2016. OCR will select entities and request they electronically submit documentation within 10 days. The third set of audits will be onsite and examine a broader scope of requirements from HIPAA Rules.

On July 11, 2016, 167 covered entities were notified that they were selected for a desk audit. Desk audits of business associates will begin this fall. Download the complete Compliance Advisor, “HIPPA Phase 2 Audits” for best practices for covered entities facing desk or field audits.

Originally published by www.ubabenefits.com

Employee Wellness Programs are a key factor in employee engagement and overall company success in today’s business world. Wellness programs are consistently evolving and changing as employee demands shift. Companies are constantly looking for new ways to engage and encourage their employees, preferably at a lower cost. Below are some effective and cost-efficient ways to enhance your employee wellness programs, leaving your employees happier and more excited about work!

  1. Walk and Talk Meetings

Walk and Talk meetings are becoming a popular new way that companies can encourage employee fitness in the workplace. The average American employee spends the vast majority of the day sitting at the desk, and studies show that 86% of them hate it. The walk and talk meetings provide a way to get up and move around, while still being productive with the work that needs to be accomplished. In addition, walking boosts creativity and new environments produce fresh ideas. A Stanford study recently found that, “walking has a very specific benefit – the improvement of creativity.” So, next time you’re looking for a boost of creativity and activity in your schedule, consider taking your meeting for a walk.

  1. Fit Bit Challenges

Fit Bits are one of the most popular fitness trackers on the market. Several employees already have personal Fit Bits so bringing them into the workplace is an easy transition. For those that do not, many companies are buying them in large bundles for resale at discounted rates to their employees. Companies are finding innovative ways to incorporate Fit Bits into their wellness programs to keep employees active while also fostering teamwork. According to Fit Bit, by holding challenges and competitions using the Fit Bit, companies create group health that is easily trackable. More specifically, “Fit Bit users with one or more friends are 27% more active.” The concept of using the Fit Bit with other employees builds better relationships as well as holds them accountable for being active.

The challenges are a simple and cost efficient way to improve overall health and many companies have had great success through using the Fit Bit. For example, The Cleveland Cavaliers’ employees did a Fit Bit walking challenge in which they logged their daily activities and food. In order to entice workers to take part, they held competitions with prizes that spiked employee participation and overall health and happiness. The result of the challenge- “employees reached their personal fitness and weight loss goals, conference room meetings became walking meetings, and elevator trips were nixed in favor of the stairs. By the time their challenge came to a close, participants had recorded a cumulative 76.6 million steps—more than 38,000 miles—and created new healthy habits to take into the future.” Your company could be the next to see amazing FitBit challenge results!

  1. Healthy Vending Machines

In order to achieve a healthy lifestyle, the combination of exercise and healthy eating is essential. For busy employees, grabbing a quick snack is a typical daily routine, however these quick grabs are often unhealthy. Keeping healthy vending machines, or stocking the fridge with fruits and vegetables allows workers to snag a healthy snack that will aid overall health and also satisfy mid-day hunger cravings. In addition, eating healthy has many cognitive benefits that can transfer into employees’ work. For example, typical benefits that arise from healthy eating are an increase in concentration and alertness, generating better work from each of your employees.

  1. Competitions

Competitions can easily be tailored to fit your company’s culture! One of the most popular workplace competitions is the Biggest Loser challenge. In this type of challenge, the employee or team of employees sets a weight loss goal. The group that loses the most weight by the end of the allotted competition time wins! Another popular challenge is signing up for local 5Ks or half marathons and running the race with your co-workers. You can encourage employees to partake in fitness challenges by having prizes or monetary rewards. Aside from the obvious health results, challenges like these encourage teamwork and healthy competition inside the workplace. Above all else, it’s important to get creative with whichever competition you choose!

The key to a successful wellness program is to make it personal to what your employees enjoy and will want to participate in. These are just a few ways that you can find success in employee wellness throughout your company. So, boost your overall employee morale and efficiency by implementing these simple yet cost efficient wellness ideas in your daily routines!

 

Contributed by Nicole Federico

Since the current version of the Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, expired on March 31, 2016, employers have been awaiting a new, updated form. On August 25, 2016, the federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approved a revised Form I-9. Consequently, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has 90 days to update the form and must publish a revised form by November 22, 2016. According to the OMB Notice of Action, this new Form I-9 will expire on August 31, 2019 — a three-year validation period similar to previous validation periods. In the meantime, employers may continue using the current version of Form I-9 (with a revision date of 03/08/2013 N) until January 21, 2017. After January 21, 2017, all previous versions of Form I-9 will be invalid.

Changes to the Form

Many of the Form I-9 changes were designed to help with completing the form and assist in reducing technical errors. For instance, new smart error-checking features have been added when the form is completed using an Adobe PDF viewer or application. Some other new features include:

  • Addition of a supplement where more than one preparer or translator is used to complete Section 1 (translator certification where an employee must check that he or she did or did not use a preparer or translator in completing the form).
  • Controls within the form for users to electronically access the instructions, print the form, and clear the form.
  • Drop-down calendars and lists.
  • Embedded instructions for completing each field.
  • Provision of additional spaces to enter multiple preparers and translators.
  • Quick-response matrix barcode (QR code) that generates once the form is printed and may be used to streamline audit processes.
  • Rather than all other names used, only requiring employees to provide other last names used in Section 1.
  • Removing the requirement that aliens authorized to work provide both foreign passport information and Form I-94 in Section 1 after attestation of such status.
  • Separating instructions from the form.
  • Specific area to enter additional information that employers are currently required to notate in the form’s margins.
  • Validations on certain fields to ensure information is entered correctly.

The new Form I-9 instructions also provide revised abbreviations for use on the form. Employers should use these abbreviations although longer, commonly used abbreviations may still be acceptable. For example, “Permanent Resident Card” is now “Perm. Resident Card (Form I-551).”

Related Rulemaking

Also important, the federal Office of Special Counsel (OSC) has proposed to revise regulations implementing a section of the Immigration and Nationality Act concerning unfair immigration-related employment practices. In these revised regulations, the OSC proposes a new definition of discrimination along with a revision to the language related to unfair documentary practices. The proposed definition clarifies that discrimination is the act of intentionally treating an individual differently, regardless of the explanation for the discrimination, and regardless of whether it is because of animus or hostility, to include the process related to completing the Form I-9.

There is also a proposed unfair documentary practices portion to prohibit unfair immigration-related employment practices. It would replace the current document abuse provision, which prohibits requiring more or different documents than presented if the employee presented documents from the list of acceptable documents. This also goes to an employer’s rejection of employee-completed Section 1 — which may be considered a discriminatory employment practice.

Currently, the USCIS provides this guidance in the prevention of discrimination in the Form I-9 process.

What to Do

As a response to the many pending changes to the Form I-9 and related laws, the next step for employers is to review current policies and procedures. For instance, employers will still be permitted to print and complete the new Form I-9 by hand, but that may not be a permanent option. In fact, employers and employees may elect to fill out any or all sections of the form by computer, by hand (printed), or a combination of both.

ThinkHR will keep you informed as more information is released. The USCIS suggests that employers visit I-9 Central and subscribe to GovDelivery to ensure receipt of the latest news on the revised Form I-9.

Originally published by www.thinkhr.com

Many of us have seen or heard about the various wellness programs referred to as “participation–based” programs. These participation-only programs continue to be the starting point for many organizations when they enter the world of workplace wellness. Participatory programs typically include a few individual and team-based activities, offer a level of electronic or onsite seminar education, and offer employees biometric screening and personal health risk assessments. Organizations may even award prizes, hold drawings, or offer giveaways.

These programs are typically created with the goals of promoting and encouraging healthier lifestyles for their employees and their families, reducing healthcare costs of the organization, or simply because ownership feels it is the right thing to do.

Fast forward a few years, and the same program is being offered. In most cases, employees have received some education and had fun, but the organization has yet to meet its original goals or experience a real culture change. Employees still seem to be leading unhealthy lifestyles, productivity and morale seem lower than ever, and healthcare claims continue to skyrocket. So why do you even have this wellness program?

In my eight years working as Wellness Program Manager for a mid-sized benefits consulting firm, I have been a part of and have seen the good, the bad, and the ugly of the programs. I have learned from mistakes made early on, and I value sharing those experiences with those I have the opportunity to consult with. I share firsthand examples from my own company’s program, as well as the experiences of my clients and other business partners. A program set up successfully – with the right support, tools, partners, and initial incentives – will absolutely reap the reward, and your organization should recognize a true cultural change.

These are the key factors that I believe contribute most to the success of a wellness program.

1. Secure senior management commitment and participation.

It is easy for business owners to say they want a wellness program, but it is a different story when they actually embrace the concept, support the process, and engage in the program themselves. Owners of organizations have come to me for help in implementing a wellness program. They assign one person to be in charge of the program, typically someone whose time is already limited, and for one reason or another the program stalls. If the top leadership of the organization is not supportive or engaged, it could take anywhere from six months to five years trying to get a sustainable wellness program off the ground. The program may not even take off at all.

I have seen these programs fizzle for many reasons, including a shift in business objectives, lack of established goals, or lack of participation or role-modeling from management or ownership. It can be recognized early whether a program is going to succeed by the support it has from its leaders. Think of a successful program much like the game “follow the leader.” Good leaders and owners should not only sponsor the program, but should also be actively engaged and supporting it, leading by example. When employees see owners and employers participating and supporting the program, they too will “follow the leader.” Once you have backing from the people who invoke change within your organization, laying the groundwork for the program will become a smoother process.

2.  Survey the organization and gather aggregate data to establish need and risk areas.

Once you have built the foundation, it is a good time to collect and gather data to determine need and evaluate aggregate risks in the organization. Of those organizations that created the participatory programs we discussed earlier, how many of them do you think actually asked their employees first what they wanted or needed in order to change unhealthy behaviors or lead a healthy lifestyle? What lifestyle-related claims is the organization experiencing that might be able to be controlled with interventions? What health risks exist within the organization? Organizations typically roll out the program before they gather the data, and then look back and wonder why their participation in their program was so low. Logically, it is because the employees didn’t want or need it or see the value.

When working with a benefits consulting firm, organizations ask for employees to be surveyed annually on their likes and dislikes in medical and dental coverage. It only makes sense that employees also be surveyed about their needs in a wellness program. The employee wellness survey may include questions about areas where they may want help, programs they would be willing to participate in, what would motivate them to engage in the program, and whether or not they are even looking to make any changes. Do not worry or be discouraged, as there is always five to ten percent of a population that is resistant to anything and will never participate regardless of what you provide.

Additional data is then obtained by analyzing your organization’s aggregate claims, if data is available. Along with claims data, organizations may also compile aggregate data through health screenings, biometrics, health and fitness diagnostics and assessments, blood work, and more.

3.  Utilize existing tools and resources, establish partnerships and seek guidance.

Many organizations may not be aware of the variety of wellness program tools and resources available to them. First, look to your benefits insurance consultant. Qualified, reputable benefit consulting firms now have credentialed wellness program managers or coordinators on staff to work alongside you and your team. Consultants can help navigate what is available to you from your insurance carrier or third party administrator and are likely tapped into local and national resources, wellness vendors, and other workplace wellness tools. One of the best parts of my role as a Wellness Program Manager is to share my passion for wellness with our clients and help them design a sustainable program. If you have a benefits consultant that is not providing this level of support or staff, it is worth inquiring.

Establish a partnership with a wellness vendor. This is one resource that is often overlooked because organizations try to do it themselves. Sustainable programs have vendors that can design programs based on need and risk, manage day-to-day program tasks, provide ongoing reporting, and recommend best practices for goal achievement.

Over the last few years, hundreds of new wellness vendors have entered the marketplace. I have worked with great vendors and vendors that I will not work with again. Employers should not settle for a “cookie cutter” program. Look for a partner that shares a similar view on wellness, one who will customize a program to satisfy your organization’s objectives. Ensure that you partner with a vendor that offers actual guidance and management of your program. CAUTION: Many vendors promote account management as a top service they provide, but few deliver. A great way to find the right vendor is through the partnerships your employee benefits consultant has established or from other business referrals and testimonials. When I place a client with a vendor, the most important thing I look for is the type of service my client will receive. Accept nothing but high quality and service.

Originally posted by www.ubabenefits.com

Employers with self-insured health plans are facing new Section 6055 regulations regarding the reporting of minimum essential coverage. The proposed regulation requires self-insured employers to report this information to the IRS on either Form 1095-B or in Part III of Form 1095-C, if the coverage is provided by an applicable large employer.

Section 6055 reporting identifies those individuals who are enrolled in minimum essential coverage. In order to accomplish this, the reporting forms require the inclusion of each individual’s Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN). For an individual, this is his or her Social Security number. While employers generally have the SSNs of their employees, they are less likely to have this information for an employee’s spouse or dependents. The proposed regulations include new guidance relating to the solicitation of TINs and the solicitation process employers should follow in order to avoid any penalties for filing without the proper TINs.

As long as “reasonable efforts” are made to secure the TINs of covered individuals, an employer is permitted to report a date of birth when no TIN has been provided. The proposed regulations lay out the following three-point process that should be used in order to meet the “reasonable efforts” guideline.

Reasonable efforts process chartIf individuals are already enrolled in coverage, July 29, 2016, is to be used as the initial solicitation date as long as a TIN was solicited as part of the application for coverage or at any other point before July 29, 2016. The second solicitation is then required within 75 days after July 29, 2016, which would be October 12, 2016.

Dan Bond, Principal at Compliancedashboard said, “Interestingly enough, these proposed regulations do not change the solicitation process for incorrect TINs, and there remains some confusion over what the IRS deems as a trigger for soliciting TINs in the situation that they are incorrect. They included a footnote in these proposed regulations that we presume is referencing the AIR [Affordable Care Act Information Returns] filing system that says just because an error message is received, that error message isn’t a notice for a penalty. Nor does the filer need to start the solicitation process in response to the error message. This statement leaves some question as to what triggers a solicitation need. We are watching to see what the IRS does with this.”

Although this process is part of a proposed rule, the IRS has stated that self-insured employers may rely on the process pending the release of a final rule.

For applicable large employers and self-funded employers of all sizes who have now completed the first round of required IRS reporting under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), request UBA’s ACA Advisor, “IRS Reporting, Now What?” for information on play or pay penalties, when the penalty is triggered, how the penalty will be assessed and documentation employers must have.

Originally posted by www.ubabenefits.com

0818On December 1, 2016, the Department of Labor (DOL) will implement changes raising the minimum compensation for exempt employees to $47,476 annually. While salary is just half of a two-part equation that includes a duties test of essential job functions, scrutiny is under way to analyze compensation and find solutions to avoid conflict with the new rule. Many employers are asking: Why not just have all employees work 40 hours and get approval for overtime?

The statutory definition of “employ” is “to suffer or permit to work.” The phrase “suffer or permit” to work does not mean “approve.” Hence, any time a nonexempt employee works, the employee must be compensated. A nonexempt employee cannot volunteer to work off the clock, so activities as innocuous as an employee arriving early and just starting their day become problematic. Common advice is to issue progressive discipline for employees who work unapproved overtime, but writing up a good employee for what they reasonably perceive to be initiative can open a new can of worms.

Employers further bear the burden of capturing and recording all time worked. Documenting compensable time is complicated when reviewing the variations of what constitutes work time. The non-exhaustive list includes:

  • Waiting or on-call time when it is on the employer’s premises (for example, waiting for a shift replacement to arrive)
  • Work-related training activities (including travel time if they are off-site
  • Eating meals while checking emails or answering phones
  • Work travel outside of the employee’s normal commute
  • Answering work emails or completing reports after work hours
  • Attendance at required company functions, including volunteer activities and social events

Even with a sophisticated time-keeping system, capturing all hours is a challenge. So what are some solutions? View the latest UBA Compliance Advisor, “Salary Considerations under the New DOL Standards,” which reviews workable solutions using salary increases, bonuses or incentives—as well as important considerations when paying nonexempt staff on a salary basis.

Originally published by United Benefit Advisors – Read More

0809Your new position just got approved and, finally, that mission-critical headcount addition is green-lighted. Celebration ensues until the actual work of finding the ideal candidate begins. The first step is to get a job description. In some cases, a perfectly vetted position analysis and description may exist, one that captures the particulars and purpose of the job. For those not fortunate enough to have a compensation professional providing such information, the search to find the right words to describe the work begins. So launches the journey of a thousand words cut-and-pasted from Indeed.com.

The recent changes to the Department of Labor (DOL) overtime rules, which will impact an estimated 4.2 million workers, put the spotlight back on job descriptions, or more specifically, the content of those documents as businesses are forced to assess whether their employees meet the duties test for exemption. This was not the first time in recent years that the DOL has focused on essential job functions. The 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) brought additional entitlements to individuals, including extending accommodation to pregnant workers and tagging onto Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) time off with allowances for extended ADA leaves. All of these changes rely on documentation of essential job functions and the conditions under which they are performed.

Since the enactment of the ADA, most employers have been incorporating physical requirements into position descriptions. If, however, the level of detail is lacking, the accommodation process can be derailed. Consider:

  • the frequency of physical requirements, not just the weight lifted, and
  • the percentage of time spent standing, sitting, bending, or moving and the level of repetition in the performance of duties.

Exempt (white collar) jobs require unique differentiators, including stamina requirements such as:

  • Longer hours and extended work weeks
  • Percentage of time spent travelling
  • Specific credentials (i.e. CPAs)

Additionally, if there are environmental or psychological requirements applicants must meet, these should be included in the job description.

The ADA views essential job duties through the lens of the ability to perform with or without accommodation, thus taking a broad view of the scope of work. Hence, it may be incumbent on an employer to reassign duties, restrict tasks or change responsibilities in order to accommodate an individual. This can create difficulties when trying to comply with the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

For example, to be considered exempt under the executive duties test within the FLSA, the employee must:

  • regularly supervise two or more other employees, and
  • have management as the primary duty of the position, and
  • have some genuine input into the job status of other employees (such as hiring, firing, promotions, or assignments).

The regulations call out specific management duties including training, appraising productivity, monitoring work, and, in general, being “in charge.” In the event that such a manager required accommodation under the ADA, it is possible that in order to comply with the letter of the law, the removal of responsibilities might result in a situation where the individual is no longer meeting the duties requirement to be considered exempt. In this scenario, it might be advisable, for example, to include language in the job description that establishes presence at work as an essential function of management.

This is not a call to front load the descriptions with an overflow of detail. It is, however, important to ensure that the job description reflects the actual functions and outcomes needed and the conditions that impact those processes. It requires careful consideration and a comprehensive needs analysis.

Free resources for detailed information about jobs include the Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook (www.bls.gov) and O*Net OnLine (www.onetonline.org). Both sites are maintained by the U.S. Department of Labor and have substantial databases of job information that represents thousands of employers nationally, providing evidentiary support for the inclusion of essential job functions in a position description.

The following is a reference chart illustrating the importance of job descriptions under each employment law.

Employment
Law
Impact of the Job Description
Fair Labor Standards
Act (FLSA)
The FLSA looks to the content of a job to as a source of information to complete a duties test to ascertain the exempt or non-exempt status of positions.

A job description is not a stand-alone validation of status, but an accurate list of essential functions can go a long way in confirming an employee’s exempt status.

Americans with Disabilities
Act and Pregnancy
Discrimination Act
Detailed job descriptions outline the requirements for a candidate to be considered “qualified.” An employer is not obligated to accommodate an applicant who cannot meet the legitimate skills, experience, education, or other requirements of a position. Pregnancy is treated the same as any other disability.

Undertaking an interactive dialog with a qualified individual depends on well-defined documentation that articulates the tasks, outcomes and the conditions under which the work is performed.

Employers may need to offer employees alternative positions as an accommodation. As new or existing jobs open, they should be reviewed to ensure the credentials needed are current and viable.

Family and Medical
Leave Act (FMLA)
In lieu of a job description, medical providers rely on employees’ characterization of their work. This can be misleading and cause the provider to miss critical information.

Employees who request intermittent leave for a serious health condition could potentially be given temporary job modifications if medical restrictions were more clearly aligned with essential job functions.

Return to work clearances may be compromised if medical providers are not given detailed information about job requirements.

Occupational Health Act Employers lower their experience rating when they are able to implement a robust light duty return to work program. This requires explicit environmental, physical and emotional details in job descriptions.

Accurate credentialing and experience requirements outlined in job descriptions can alleviate accidents and injuries from unqualified workers.

Title VII, including Age
Discrimination in
Employment
Title VII requires that consideration for hiring and compensation, be based on bona fide job requirements. Accurate, impartial recaps of work requirements can serve as a defense against allegations of bias.

Employee performance, which impacts discipline, promotion and opportunities for advancement should be measured against the road map of a comprehensive job description that is measurable and defendable.

Originally published by United Benefit Advisors – Read More

233HMillennials account for the largest demographic in the workforce today, and by 2025 will make up 75% of our working population.  With new technologies, more people deciding to branch out and start their own businesses and telecommuting jobs becoming popular, it’s important for employers to understand how they need to adapt previous HR policies for recruitment and retention to fit today’s workforce.

A promising solution to this change in the playing field is to offer a student loan repayment program as part of an employee benefit package.  In a study done by the American Payroll Association, it was found that two-thirds of Americans live paycheck to paycheck. As college tuition costs rise, millennials who graduate and enter the workforce are finding themselves with large amounts of debt while simultaneously facing job scarcity.

In fact, not only are millennials inhibited from saving due to student loans, they have the lowest retirement savings rate of any demographic at 7.5%. Because there is evidence that millennials also are not as responsive to the traditional employee benefit package and instead seek jobs where they are more likely to have work/life balance as well as travel and vacation opportunities, offering a student loan benefit gives employers hope that innovations can be made to attract top young talent.

Prudential Retirement is partnering with Student Loan Genius to develop a creative solution to the one barrier to this otherwise highly inventive idea: the fact that no current tax breaks exist for loan repayment programs, thus employees could end up being heavily taxed if they receive a loan repayment benefit.

Prudential Retirement and Student Loan Genius are working to offer a pre-tax 401k contribution whenever an employee makes a payment on their loan. This type of contribution would help an employee avoid heavy taxing and simultaneously save for retirement.

According to the Employee Benefit Research Institute, millennials have lower employee benefit participation rates than Gen Xers or Baby Boomers. Seventy-six percent of respondents to the American Student Assistance’s recent survey indicated that their choice to take a job would be positively impacted if a student loan repayment program was offered.  As employers continue to search for new ways to engage their workforce in these programs and hire new talent, some form of loan repayment program may be the answer.

 

by Kate McGaughey