All posts in Life Insurance

The Risk of Being Uninsured (and the Hidden Bargain in Addressing It Now) | Ohio Benefit Advisors

Categories: Benefits, Blog, Employee Communication, Employees, Life Insurance, Uncategorized
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With all the expenses of everyday living, it’s tempting to think of insurance as just another cost. What’s harder to see is the potential cost of not buying insurance—or what’s known as “self-insuring”—and the hidden bargain of coverage.

The Important vs. the Urgent
We’ve all experienced it: the tendency to stay focused on putting out fires, while never getting ahead on the things that really matter in the long run. For most people, there are two big things that matter in the long run: their families and their ability to retire. And being properly insured is important to both those concerns.

Life Insurance: a Hidden Bargain?
It’s exceedingly rare, but we all know it can happen: someone’s unexpected death. Life insurance can prevent financial catastrophe for the loved ones left behind, if they depend on you for income or primary care—or both.

The irony is that many people pass on coverage due to perceived cost, when in fact it’s far less expensive that most people think. The 2016 Insurance Barometer Study, by Life Happens and LIMRA showed that 8 in 10 people overestimate the cost of life insurance. For instance, a healthy, 30-year-old man can purchase a 20-year, $250,000 term life insurance policy for $160 a year—about $13 a month.

Enjoy the Benefits of Life Insurance—While You’re Alive
If budget pressures aren’t an issue, consider the living benefits of permanent life insurance—that’s right, benefits you can use during your own lifetime.

Permanent life insurance policies typically have a higher premium than term life insurance policies in the early years. But unlike term insurance, it provides lifelong protection and the ability to accumulate cash value on a tax-deferred basis.

Cash values can be used in the future for any purpose you wish. If you like, you can borrow cash value for a down payment on a home, to help pay for your children’s education or to provide income for your retirement.

When you borrow money from a permanent insurance policy, you’re using the policy’s cash value as collateral and the borrowing rates tend to be relatively low. And unlike loans from most financial institutions, the loan is not dependent on credit checks or other restrictions. You ultimately must repay any loan with interest or your beneficiaries will receive a reduced death benefit and cash-surrender value.

In this way, life insurance can serve as a powerful financial cushion for you and your family throughout your life, in addition to protecting your family from day one.

Disability Insurance: For the Biggest Risk of All
The most overlooked of the major types of insurance coverage is the one that actually covers a far more common risk—the risk of becoming ill or injured and being unable to work and earn your paycheck.

How common is it? While no one knows the exact numbers, it’s estimated that 30% of American workers will become disabled for 90 days or more during their working years. The sad reality is that most American workers also cannot afford such an event. In fact, illness and injury are the top reasons for foreclosures and bankruptcies in the U.S. today. Disability insurance ensures that if you are unable to work because of illness or injury, you will continue to receive an income and make ends meet until you’re able to return to work.

It’s tempting to cross your fingers and hope misfortune skips over you. But when you look at the facts, it’s easy to see: getting proper coverage against life’s risks is not just important, but a bargain in disguise.

By Erica Oh Nataren
Originally Posted By www.lifehappens.org

3 Questions to Ask When It Comes to Life Insurance | Ohio Benefit Advisors

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Your life insurance needs will ebb and flow throughout your lifetime. Buying a term policy early in your career or taking a basic employer-issued life insurance policy is a common course of action.

However, deciding how much and what type of life insurance you need at each stage of your life will serve you and your loved ones much better.

One simple thing to keep in mind throughout this process is that the more responsibility you have, the more life insurance you need. Here are a few questions to consider:

1. Who depends on me?
Of course, if you have children, a term life insurance policy that is large enough to pay off your home and debts with some money left over to support your family while your spouse or partner grieves and recalibrates the new financial situation is the option that gives everyone peace of mind.

Many times, it’s easy to overlook the other people who depend on you. The care of elderly parents or grandparents, siblings, or people in your family with special needs should also be considered carefully when deciding how much basic life insurance to buy. You can also get a working idea of how much you might need with this Life Insurance Needs Calculator.

2. How much insurance can I afford?
A term life insurance policy that covers the care of your loved ones in the event of your untimely death is an inexpensive option, if you are under 40 and in reasonably good health.

Permanent life insurance insurance is worth researching if you know you have a permanent need for life insurance, such as caring for a special needs child or sibling. It also makes sense if you’d like certain benefits beyond a guaranteed death benefit for your loved ones, like premiums that do not increase with age or changing health conditions, and a cash value that you can borrow against.

If you can afford the additional premium amount and expect your financial situation and income to remain stable long-term, whole life insurance policies offer living benefits that may outweigh the temporary pain of higher premiums.

3. How healthy am I?
People in great health who have only a little bit of wiggle room in their monthly budget may want to consider a combination of term and permanent life insurance coverage.

Your clean bill of health will keep premiums for both types of insurance lower than if you have major health issues. If you have a term life insurance policy but want more coverage, adding a permanent policy to the mix may be the ideal answer.

By adding a permanent policy with a cash-value element to your portfolio, you also open a world of options that could help add to your nest egg in retirement, start a business, or pursue a second career, among other benefits.

It is possible to have multiple policies and customize your life insurance to your changing wants and needs. Choosing a policy or combination of policies that gives you and your family the greatest potential benefit may seem tricky. So, simplifying the process by asking these three questions will set you on the right track.

By Peter Colis
Originally Posted By www.lifehappens.org

Voluntary Benefits are Supplementary Benefits in addition to the core benefits package that the employee can choose to add.

As a parent, perhaps you’ve been able to check the critical financial boxes for your family. You’ve established emergency funds, secured life and disability insurance, and are on track with your retirement goals. You may wonder, is there anything else I could be doing to help my children?

This can be the time for parents and even grandparents to consider juvenile life insurance. It’s an often-misunderstood type of life insurance that provides protection for your children or grandchildren.

For some, the topic of juvenile life insurance evokes confusion and perhaps even fear. After all, why would one want to insure a perfectly healthy child?

Thankfully, the loss of a child is extremely rare. So while a juvenile life insurance policy does indeed insure against this very slim risk, some types of coverage are also designed to protect your child’s financial future—in a way no other financial product can.

3 types of juvenile life insurance

1) Juvenile permanent life insurance. This type of coverage is permanent, as long as premiums are paid, and typically accumulates cash value over the years, just like with permanent life insurance for adults. Juvenile policies are generally issued at the lowest rates available, and with limited underwriting. They’re owned by a parent or grandparent until the child is 18, at which point the now-adult insured (even if he’s still just a child in his parents’ eyes) can assume ownership.

Upon ownership, the insured adult child enjoys some distinct benefits:

Guaranteed insurability. Your daughter or son locks in a low rate and continued coverage—and can generally purchase more life insurance up to allowable limits. This may be the most compelling reason parents buy juvenile life insurance. Insurability is easy to take for granted when you have it. While most children are healthy, a future health concern could one day make your son or daughter hard to insure. This affects their entire family, who must find other ways to protect against financial vulnerability.

Cash value. The policy’s cash value grows tax-deferred over time, making it a reliable savings vehicle with some unique characteristics. If the cash is needed, the policyowner can access it through low-interest policy loans or outright withdrawals. The policy can also be surrendered for the cash value, typically minus a surrender fee.

2) Juvenile term life insurance. In contrast to juvenile permanent life insurance, juvenile term offers parents significantly less expensive coverage. However, term life insurance does not have a cash value, and only lasts for a specific length of time, such as 10, 20 or 30 years. Policyowners pay a level premium during the length of the term, at which point the term expires and coverage becomes more expensive, often significantly so.

Juvenile term coverage is typically available as a rider (basically, a coverage option) on a parent’s term policy. This rider typically lasts until your child reaches adulthood. You can often purchase coverage for all your children for the same price, with a single rider. In the event of the unexpected death of an insured, the policy’s death benefit can be used to cover expenses.

3) Juvenile group life insurance. Finally, some employers offer juvenile life insurance options through their group life insurance coverage. While convenient, keep in mind employee benefit programs can change at any time, and that in general, group life insurance can be hard or impossible to take with you if you leave your employer.

Remember, while you may have a lot of other priorities on your plate, juvenile life insurance can help create a bedrock of financial stability for your children as they come of age in an uncertain world.

By Erica Oh Nataren
Originally published by www.lifehappens.org

Let’s face it. Most people put off buying life insurance for any number of reasons—if they even understand it Take a look at this list—do any of them sound like you?

1. It’s too expensive. In the ever-burgeoning budget of a young family, things like day care and car payments and possibly student loans eat up a good chunk of the money each month, and a lot of people think that life insurance is just outside those “necessities” when money’s tight. But two things: life insurance is often not nearly as expensive as you might think, especially when you can get a good policy for less than the cost of a daily cup of coffee at the local café, and well, if money’s tight now, what if something happens to you?

2. That’s that stuff for babies and old people, right? People of a certain age remember Ed McMahon telling them their grandparents couldn’t be turned down for any reason and figure that’s the target demographic for life insurance. Or, you might have been offered a small permanent insurance policy for your newborn, attractively presented with a cherubic infant on the envelope. The truth of the matter is that these are very specific insurance products—just as there are many insurance products for adults in their working years.

3. I’m strong and healthy! You eat right, you stay active, and everyone admires how grounded and centered you are. You passed your last physical with flying colors! That’s GREAT! But you’re neither immortal nor indestructible. It’s not even that something could happen to you – though it could – so much as when you’re at your strongest and healthiest, there’s no better time to get a policy to protect your loved ones. If you fall seriously ill or suffer significant injury later, it will make it tougher to get that kind of policy, if any at all.

4. I have life insurance through my job. Many people are offered life insurance as part of their employee benefit coverage –and often, it’s the first time they encounter life insurance and have no idea that a $50,000 policy, or one or two times their salary, isn’t as much as they think it is. It sounds like a lot of money, until you figure that it has to cover some or all the expenses for your loved ones in your absence. Plus, if you leave the job, it’s typically the type of insurance that doesn’t “move on” with you.

5. I don’t have kids. Sure, kids are a big reason why some people get life insurance. But that’s not the only litmus for needing protection. If there is anyone in your life who would suffer financially from your loss—your spouse or live-in partner, a sibling, even your parents—a life insurance policy goes a long way in making sure everyone’s still OK even if something happens to you.

6. Life insurance—it’s on my list … eventually. There’s no deadline on life insurance, no mandate from the government on purchasing it. Your parents may have never talked to you about its importance, and it’s certainly not the most invigorating topic for conversation. But don’t let your “eventually” turn into your loved ones’ “if only.”

By Helen Mosher
Originally published by www.lifehappens.org

Employer-paid life insurance can be an important part of protecting your family in the event that you die prematurely. Companies offer the program on top of other benefits, such as health insurance. The coverage is generally term insurance, meaning there is no investment or cash-value component. If you pass on unexpectedly, depriving your family not only of your presence but also your income, your dependents will be glad you signed up for your workplace’s life insurance benefit.

Basics

Employer-paid term life insurance comes as an option through some employee benefits packages. It works, in a sense, like group health insurance: Rather than buying a separate policy for each employee, the employer buys a single policy that covers all workers who participate, according to Insurance.com. Thus, the employer pays one premium, not a separate premium for each employee. You may be responsible for a part of the premium, too. Typically, the death benefit is one or two times your yearly salary, according to the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants.

Advantages

Life insurance acquired through your employer is likely to be cheaper than what you can buy on the open market, since your employer is likely to cover at least part of the premiums, according to Insurance.com. Additionally, you do not have to undergo individual underwriting, which means you can get coverage even if you have a serious health condition, like heart disease, that would, according to Insure.com, get you denied or make you have to pay high premiums if you were buying on the open market.

Warning

Depending exclusively on employer-paid life insurance to protect your family has some disadvantages, according to Insurance.com. The main one is that if you leave your job, you stand a high chance of losing your insurance. Depending on your age and health status at that time, according to Insurance.com, you may or may not be able to get new insurance at a reasonable rate. For that reason, it is best to carry employer group insurance only as a supplement to other coverage. Another drawback to such coverage is that the amount of insurance available to you is likely to be limited, though some plans allow you to get more coverage for an additional fee.

Considerations

Some employer-paid life insurance plans, according to the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants’ 360 Degrees of Financial Literacy website, can follow you even when you leave your job. But most employees decide against doing this for the reason that the “conversion premiums” tend to be higher than prices for comparable individual policies. Typically, according to the site, “only those who are otherwise uninsurable take advantage of this conversion option.”

Taxes

The Internal Revenue Service taxes life insurance that has a value above $50,000. It uses a formula that takes into account your age and the amount of your death benefit to determine the taxable value per month.

Originally published by www.livestrong.com